IT’s OFFICIAL: Processed Red Meats Cause Cancer

This article appeared on NPR this morning.   It is an empirical finding by the World Health Organization.

The World Health Organization has put bacon, hot dogs and sausages in the same category of cancer risk as tobacco smoking.

The World Health Organization has put bacon, hot dogs and sausages in the same category of cancer risk as tobacco smoking.

The World Health Organization has deemed that processed meats — such as bacon, sausages and hot dogs — cause cancer.

In addition, the WHO says red meats including beef, pork, veal and lamb are “probably carcinogenic” to people.

A group of 22 scientists reviewed the evidence linking red meat and processed meat consumption to cancer, and concluded that eating processed meats regularly increases the risk of colorectal cancer. Their evidence review is explained in an article published in The Lancet.

The conclusion puts processed meats in the same category of cancer risk as tobacco smoking and asbestos. This does not mean that they are equally dangerous, says the International Agency for Research on Cancer — the agency within the WHO that sets the classifications. And it’s important to note that even things such as aloe vera are on the list of possible carcinogens.

In a Q & A released by the IARC, the agency says that “eating meat has known health benefits,” but it also points out that the cancer risk increases with the amount of meat consumed. As we’ve reported, studies show that the heaviest meat eaters tend to have the highest risk.

The IARC says high-temperature cooking methods (such as cooking meat in direct contact with a flame) produce more carcinogenic compounds. However, the group says there were not enough data “to reach a conclusion about whether the way meat is cooked affects the risk of cancer.”

Susan Gapstur of the American Cancer Society says the society recommends “consuming a healthy diet with an emphasis on plant foods and limiting consumption of processed meat and red meat,” she told us in a written statement.

The recommendation, Gapstur tells The Salt, is based on research. For instance, a systematic literature review on colorectal cancer published in 2011 by the World Cancer Research Fund found a statistically significant, 16 percent increased risk of colorectal cancer associated with each 100 grams of red and processed meat consumed. As the ACS points out, this is an amount of meat roughly equivalent in size to a deck of cards.

The Lancet paper points out that red meat also contains “high biological-value proteins and important micronutrients such as B vitamins, iron and zinc.” And the North American Meat Institute says lots of research points to the benefits of red meat consumption.

“Scientific evidence shows cancer is a complex disease not caused by single foods and that a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle choices are essential to good health,” writes Barry Carpenter, president of the North American Meat Institute, in a statement on the new WHO classification.

Carpenter says it’s important to put this new classification in context. “IARC’s panel was given the basic task of looking at hazards that meat could pose at some level, under circumstance, but was not asked to consider any off-setting benefits, like the nutrition that meat delivers or the implications of drastically reducing or removing meat from the diet altogether,” the statement concludes.

Neeee-HAWWWW!

I grew up in a small town where, if one did not have a horse….well…everyone DID have horses, so that’s a moot point. I spent many, many hours during my childhood and teen years barrel racing, both for fun and in competitions on Friday nights at the “Play Day” rodeo practice in a nearby town. Bet I could still do it today if I had a horse. I miss it! Anyway….my friend, Tommy just sent me this video. Said he thought of me. Ha. ha.

Thanks, Mr. W! 🙂

The Beatrix Report

Day #2 in her new home, and our sweet little honey bee has adjusted beautifully!    Beatrix  is a live wire and definitely on top of her game!  I am already head over heels in love with her….and owe a bucket of love to the person that talked me into getting her.  I took B. to Ingrid’s preschool this afternoon and all the children got to meet her. She was shy for the first 30 seconds, then lavished everyone with puppy kisses galore!  She loved it there, and was so GOOD!

She is a great little dog.  The children loved her and it was so much fun to witness their enthusiasm!

Beatrix goes to schoolRene Best musician       Rene Best guitarist       René Best musician

bschool2Rene Best musician        Rene Best guitarist

bea sleepingOf course, by the end of the day, she was completely exhausted.  She is lying in her bed in front of the fireplace as I write this.  Look!  She has a little smile on her face.  This has been a great day!

 

Beatrix day2

I am grateful today.  So grateful.  We are all smiles around here these days.

stacy ingrid happy

To Die or to Dye?

Image

There is no reason why environmental scientists and nature conservationists should not  dye elephant tusks pink. Let’s not wait for one more killing. Pink tusks say, “NO!” to poachers, “There is no value.” To tourists pink says, “Support wildlife. We are heading for extinction.”

Please share and re-blog so that this practical and inexpensive idea becomes a reality!